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Playing For Change

A decade ago a small group of documentary filmmakers set out with a dream to create a film rooted in the music of the streets. Not only has that dream been realized, it has blossomed into a global sensation called Playing For Change, a project including musicians of every level of renown, that has touched the lives of millions of people around the world.

While traveling the world filming and recording musicians, the crew became intimately involved with the music and people of each community they visited. Although many of these communities had limited resources and a modest standard of living, the people in them were full of generosity, warmth, and above all they were connected to each other by a common thread: music.

Video showing people famous and not so famous playing together from different countries: Brazil, Argentina, India, Cape Verde, Jamaica, Cuba, Spain, USA, etc.. Images and editing all done by the international NGO Playing For Change.

http://playingforchange.com/

 

 

 

 

Mantras

mantra (Tib.སྔགས་ ngak; Wyl. sngags) [1] is a sound, syllable, word, or group of words that is considered capable of “creating transformation” (cf. spiritual transformation).[2] Its use and type varies according to the school and philosophy associated with the mantra.[3]

Mantras (Devanāgarī मन्त्र) originated in the Vedic tradition of India, later becoming an essential part of the Hindu tradition and a customary practice within BuddhismSikhism, and Jainism. The use of mantras is now widespread throughout various spiritual movements which are based on, or off-shoots of, the practices in the earlier Eastern traditions and religions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantra

The Gāyatrī Mantra is a highly revered mantra, based on a Vedic Sanskrit verse from a hymn of the Rigveda (3.62.10), attributed to the rishiViśvāmitra. The mantra is named for its vedic gāyatrī metre.[1] As the verse can be interpreted to invoke the deva Savitr, it is often called Sāvitrī.[2]Its recitation is traditionally preceded by oṃ and the formula bhūr bhuvaḥ svaḥ, known as the mahāvyāhṛti (“great utterance”).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gayatri_Mantra

Oṃ maṇipadme hūṃ[1] (Sanskrit: ओं मणिपद्मे हूं, IPA: [õːː məɳipəd̪meː ɦũː]) is the six syllabled mantra particularly associated with the four-armed Shadakshari form of Avalokiteshvara (Tibetan Chenrezig, Chinese Guanyin), the bodhisattva of compassion. Mani means “the jewel” and Padma means “the lotus”.

The mantra is especially revered by devotees of the Dalai Lama, as he is said to be an incarnation of Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara.

It is commonly carved onto rocks or written on paper which is inserted into prayer wheels, said to increase the mantra’s effects.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Om_mani_padme_hum

 

Aum Namah Shivaya (Sanskrit Aum Namaḥ Śivāya ॐ नमः शिवाय) is a popular mantra in Hinduism and particularly in Shaivism. Its translation is “adoration (namas) to Śiva“, preceded by the mystical syllable “Aum“.

It is also called Panchakshara, the “five-syllable” mantra (viz., excluding the Aum). It is part of the Shri Rudram Chamakam, a Hindu prayer taken from the Black Yajurveda, and thus predates the use of Shiva as a proper name, in the original context being an address to Rudra (the later Shiva), where śiva retains its original meaning as an adjective meaning “auspicious, benign, friendly”, a euphemistic epithet of Rudra.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aum_Namah_Shivaya

The Mul Mantar (Punjabi: ਮੂਲ ਮੰਤਰ, Mūla Maṃtar, pronounced Mool Mantar) is the first composition in the Sikh holy book, the Adi Granth. It is a series of affirmations and is the basis of Sikh theology.[1] The Mul Mantar is the first composition of Guru Nanak and the origin of the Adi Granth. The Adi Granth begins with the Mul Mantar and it occurs more than one hundred times throughout the text.[2] The Mul Mantar is the most widely known part of Sikh scripture but it has posed a challenge to translators.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mul_Mantra